pm-announces-21-day-lockdown-summary

As the death toll from COVID-19 has risen to 12, the Prime minister on Tuesday announced a 21-day lockdown for the entire country, stating that it was the only way to break the chain of infection. The lockdown is going to remain in effect till April 14.

Rationale for introducing 21-day lockdown:

  • Rising number of infected cases: India on Tuesday recorded 564 positive cases, with the number of positive patients in Kerala and Maharashtra crossing 100.
  • Worldwide scenario:
    • Fears are also mounting that more could be hit as the global coronavirus toll inches towards 17,000.
    • Even countries like the U.S. and Italy which are considered to have good health infrastructure are struggling to control the situation.

No curbs on essential goods

  • The Ministry of Home Affairs also issued a slew of guidelines to be followed by the States to contain COVID-19 and 
    • asked all “enforcement authorities to note that these strict restrictions fundamentally relate to the movement of people, but not to that of essential goods”.

Context:As the death toll from COVID-19 has risen to 12, the Prime minister recently announced a 21-day lockdown for the entire country, stating that it was the only way to break the chain of infection. The lockdown is going to remain in effect till April 14.

Rationale for introducing 21-day lockdown:

  • Rising number of COVID-19 infected cases:India has recorded 564 positive cases till now, with the number of positive patients in Kerala and Maharashtra having already crossed 100.
  • Worldwide scenario:
    • Fears are also mounting that more could be hit as the global coronavirus toll inches towards 17,000.
    • Even countries like the U.S. and Italy which are considered to have good health infrastructure are struggling to control the situation.
  • Experiences of the lockdown in affected countries:Countries that have managed to get some control over the surge in cases show that a lockdown for a sustained period of time is the only way to break the chain of infection.

No curbs on essential goods

  • The Ministry of Home Affairs also issued a slew of guidelines to be followed by the States to contain COVID-19 an
    • asked all “enforcement authorities to note that these strict restrictions fundamentally relate to the movement of people, but not to that of essential goods”.
 

What remains open:

What will be closed:

  • Petrol Pumps, CNG, LPG, PNG
  • Banks, insurance offices, print and electronic media
  • Disaster management, power transmission units
  • Police, home guards, defence and armed forces
  • Capital and debt market services as notified by SEBI
  • Electricity, water and sanitation
  • Hospitals, nursing homes, fire stations, ATMs will continue to work
  • Fair price shops and those dealing with food, groceries, fruits, vegetables, dairy, meat, fish, animal fodder
  • All transport services (road, rail and air)to remain suspended during the lockdown period
  • Hospitality services
  • Suspension of Railway services will be extended till April 14
  • Educational, social, political institutions
  • Not more than 20 people permitted during funerals
  • All private offices
  • Offices of state/ Union territory government and autonomous bodies
 

Punishments for violations:

  •  States to act against any person violating the containment measures as per provisions of
    • Section 51-60 of the Disaster Management Act, 2005
    • Section 188 of the IPC, punishable by up to two years in jail and and a fine.
 

Section 188 of the Indian Penal Code

Section 3 of the Epidemic Diseases Act, 1897: Provides penalties for disobeying any regulation or order made under the Act. These are according to Section 188 of the Indian Penal Code (Disobedience to order duly promulgated by a public servant).

 

Section 188, reads:

  • Disobedience to order duly promulgated by public servant - Whoever, knowing that, by an order promulgated by a public servant lawfully empowered to promulgate such order, he is directed to abstain from a certain act, disobeys such direction,shall, if such disobedience causes or tends to cause obstruction, annoyance or injury, be punished with simple imprisonment for a term which may extend to one month or with fine which may extend to two hundred rupees, or with both.
  • If such disobedience causes or tends to cause danger to human life, health or safety, or causes or tends to cause a riot, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to six months, or with fine which may extend to one thousand rupees, or with both.
  •  
  • Explanation - It is not necessary that the offender should intend to produce harm, or contemplate his disobedience as likely to produce harm. It is sufficient that he knows of the order which he disobeys, and that his disobedience produces, or is likely to produce, harm.
 

Sources:

 
   

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